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tv   News  Al Jazeera  April 4, 2014 6:00am-9:01am EDT

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anything you want to. >> hop in as these courageous drivers take you on an inspiring journey. >> you don't like this country, get the hell out of here. >> driven an america tonight special series and don't miss the premiere of borderland, a ground breaking television event on al jazeera america ♪ severe weather in the midwest leaving behind a trail of destruction and the dangerous storms continuing across the country this morning. information on the gunman who killed three people at fort hood and what authorities said set him off. living in the streets of chile following a massive earthquake and many people there are still afraid to go home. >> a turtle or a bird has a
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beak. >> reporter: and a little money from the smaller donors goes a long way and they are providing kids of all ages a hands-on science lesson. good morning and welcome to al jazeera america, i'm stephanie sy, military officials are revealing more about the man who gunned down three soldiers at fort hood and identified specialist ivan lopez as the shooter. investigators say the iraq war veteran was taking medication for anxiety and depression but a psychiatric evaluation last month suggested he was not prone to violence. they are still trying to figure out why lopez went on a rampage and brandon has been tracking developments from texas and brandon good morning, we are learning a lot more about the shooter now. >> so true. investigators say there is a strong possibility that lopez argued with one or more soldiers shortly before the shooting and
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rrts suggest she was updebt he was granted 24 hour leave to attend his mother's funeral and they are looking into it why they piece together why this happened. by all accounts no one can predict the violence unleashed by specialist ivan lopez, an experienced soldier who spent half his life in the military. on capitol hill thursday the army's top brass discussed his experience and military record. >> this was an experienced soldier and spent nine years in the puerto rico national guard before coming on active duty and he is a very experienced soldier. >> he had a clean record in terms of his behavioral and outstanding, no bad marks for major miss behaviors that we are yet aware of. >> reporter: but as officials look for a motive as to what would cause this husband and father to go on a shooting rampage that killed three people and wounded 16 others, it's the
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mental stability and actions leading to shootings that may yield some clues. >> we have very strong evidence that he had a medical history that indicates unstable psychiatric or psychological condition. going through all the records to ensure that that is, in fact, correct but we believe that to be the fundamental underlying cause of factors. >> reporter: lopez had seen a military psychiatrist as late as lost month where he was treated for depression and anxiety and he was taking sleep medication. in 2011 lopez served four months of duty in iraq while he never saw combat and there are no records of any injuries. military officials said he told his supervisors he suffered from a brain injury and evaluated for post-traumatic stress disorder and examining the possibility that lopez may had an argument with one or more soldiers in the minutes leading up to the shooting. >> we do not have that
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definitively at this point. but we do have strong indications of that. >> reporter: meanwhile lopez's wife is cooperating with the f.b.i. in helping them to understand her husband's state of mind. but even back at their apartment complex a short distance from fort hood, neighbors say there was no indication of the shooting that was to come. >> i saw him at lunch. you know, and he seemed perfectly fine. and it was just mind blowing really. >> reporter: we've also learned the names of one of those that died, sergeant timothy owens and born in illinois, raised in missouri. we have been updated on the conditions of those injured, of the nine most seriously injured six have been released and three have been upgraded from critical to serious condition. stephanie. >> okay brandon reporting from texas, brandon thank you. a powerful storm system is bringing hail, rain and in some cases tornados to parts of the
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midwest and the south. take a look at the size of this hail which fell in parts of oklahoma. the national weather service says winds reached up to 110 miles per hour there on thursday. the hail was bigger in texas. it was the size of baseballs in the city of denton and in arkansas fallen tree limbs knocked out power in western parts of the state and more on the extreme storms let's bring in metrologist nicole mitchell and good morning. >> those are just a couple elements of this storm. we have also had heavy snow, i'll get to that in a second and places seen flooding rain because this is dumping a lot of rain as it's going along. st. louis where we had, waking um to tornado sirens yesterday morning, look at the rain that has come down. obviously this is that turn around, don't drown element, you saw cars stuck in that. it's going to be more of those problems today for states such as missouri, illinois, moving across to indiana. so let's take a look at all of this on the radar and you can see the heaviest bands of rain
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where we have seen the flooding but on the south side of that it has been the severe stuff, more than yesterday, as expected or more than the day before, we had over 200 reports, a lot of this was the hail. but so far eight reports of tornados that will go back in and confirm if all those made the ground or if some reports were duplicative but you can see from texas up through missouri some of those tornado reports as well. hail causing a lot of damage and still this morning those thunderstorms going through. so we have a number of places even up for anything from tornado watches to some of those thunderstorm warnings as the storms roll through. as i said this is just one element. so ahead of the storm still severe risk today but the north is winter storm elements we are dealing with. heavy snow in minnesota now moving into parts of wisconsin and michigan. some of these places could see over a foot of snow. some places even two in the up of michigan, back to you. >> thank you, some residents
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along chile northern coast are spending a second night sleeping outside their homes and afraid to go inside buildings damaged by tuesday's powerful 8.2 magnitude earthquake that killed six people. and we report from one of the hardest hit areas where strong after shocks are still being felt. >> reporter: a boat flying through the air in the port here. one of dozens of fishing vessels that can no longer float in the water. . >> translator: we were 200 meters on the dock when it struck and crashing the boat on the peer and my arms are crossed and i cannot work to feed my family. >> reporter: , in fact, no one is out fishing. the port is closed and in any case there is no ice to keep the catch fresh i'm told. it's been three days since a massive earthquake brought the port city of half a million people to a stand still and patience is beginning to wear thin. this water is only good enough for the toilet this woman
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complains. nearby we discover that hundreds of merchants from neighboring bolivia who come to the tax-freeport for the day to buy merchandise are penniless and the border is blocked by a landslide. >> translator: i never had this experience before. we don't have earthquakes in bolivia. i want to go home. >> reporter: there have been hundreds of after shocks, at least one as strong as the earthquake and so residents of this neighborhood are taking to the hills. he shows us the structural damage to his flat, the worst is in his son's bedroom. >> translator: we are sleeping outside in a tent. we are afraid the flat will collapse on top of us because the main pillars of the building are now bent, it's too dangerous. >> reporter: thousands of homes are damaged, the government is just beginning to assess the destruction and plan a strategy
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to help the victims. no longer willing to wait for the road to open these bolivians are starting to walk to the border, 450 kilometers away. >> reporter: 450 kilometers is 280 miles between new york city and washington d.c. a series of smaller earthquakes struck california over the past 24 hours, 3.2 magnitude tremor south of malibu and slightly larger quake hit in napa valley in the northern part of the state. >> earthquake. >> reporter: and our own reporter john literally got quite a jolt when that earthquake struck while he was doing a story about defecting quakes before they happen. we will have his full report in our next hour. a journalist working for the associated press has been killed in afghanistan. the attack took place near the border with pakistan in the town of coast. officials say a unit commander
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shot ap photographer of germany and she died on the spot. he also shot the ap kathy gannon who is canadian and in critical condition and they were reporting on elections and they will disrupt them and targeted candidates, election sites and offices and an after georgiaen journalist with afp was killed with 8 others when the taliban attacked a luxury hotel in kabul. secretary of state john kerry said miss east peace talks are at a critical moment and israel cancelled the release of the fourth prisoners and as we report both sides are blaming each other for violating an agreement to keep the process going through the end of the month. >> reporter: for 247 days america's top diplomate made middle east peace the top priority. john kerry met 39 officials and
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over 40 with israelis and press conference after press conference but thursday alone and separated from both sides by 1500 miles, kerry made a last-minute plea for them to keep talking. >> the leaders have to lead. and they have to be able to see a moment when it's there. there is an old saying you can lead a horse to water but you can't make it drink. now is time to drink and the leaders need to know that. >> reporter: but neither side seems thirsty first after releasing three groups of prisoners they refused to release a fourth group even though they promised to and palestinian president signed 15 international agreements and he promised not to during the talks. and now in response the israelis officially cancelled the prisoner release. >> decision by the israelis to delay the release of the fourth prisoners creates challenges. >> reporter: the question is whether those challenges are
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insurmountable. >> i think the president and secretary kerry need to be involved and engaged in the process by proding sides for unilateral moves and take necessary steps needed and make the kind of compromises and demonstrate the flexibility that neither side has thus far been able to do. >> reporter: neither side walked away yet. and that means kerry and his aids will keep working to keep both sides talking. >> we will continue no matter what to try to facilitate the capacity of people to be able to make peace. >> reporter: but so far that pressure has failed. on wednesday night the u.s. hosted a tri lateral meeting for 9 hours and into thursday morning and contentious and both sides says it solves nothing. a senior official posed a question does the u.s. want peace more than the israelis and palestinians want it?
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the answer to that question will determine whether these peace talks survive or die. i'm nick with al jazeera jerusalem. >> israel's refusal to release the prisoners is prompting calls for major demonstrations in the west bank and israel wants the palestinian authority to agree to continue with talks before it will release those prisoners, russia arrested 25 ukraines it suspects of plotting attacks in southern and central russia and they are described as ultra nash list movements and security service is calling them nonsense and follow accusations from ukraine that russian staff assisted the former ukraine government during february protests in kiev which more than 100 people were killed. meanwhile interim prime minister tells them ukraine will never recognize the take over of crimea and calls the seizing a crime. the senate intelligence committee voted to declassify part of a cia report, it details
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the agency's detention and tear gags program launched after 9/11 terrorist attacks and it could be the most definitive account so far of the cia's actions. >> reporter: did the cia cross the line using water boarding and other techniques to interrogate suspects after 9/11 and did it work, is this how u.s. tracked down bin laden and prevented other attacks and we may know and voted 11-3 thursday to give the public a look at the summary of the 6200-page report. >> results i think were shocking. it chronicles a stain on our history that must never be allowed to happen again. this is not what americans do. >> reporter: even republicans who voted for disclosure question whether this report is accurate. there are no direct interviews with the cia or anyone in the bush administration.
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and no republicans join the investigation. they thought it was biased. >> i was never in favor of this report being done. i think it was a waste of time. general public can makeup their minds about whether or not this was done properly. >> reporter: the cia claims the committee accessed information without being authorized. committee chair diane feinstein accused cia of spying on the investigation and now it's up to president obama how soon this report goes public. >> he would expect that the actions that are necessary to declassify a document like that be conducted in all due haste. >> tracey pots reporting in our next hour we will take a closer look at the possible declassification of the report and why it could take a long time for all of the facts to come out. south korea presents what it says is proof north korea is spying on them. officials showed photos they allege were taken by north korean unmanned drone and say it
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took 190 photos of the presidential office and other areas in seoul and south korea found the drone a week ago on the shore of a border island and the current radar system failed to detect it. the search for malaysia airlines 370 is becoming a race against time, authorities say they will begin searching under water for the plane's black box today. the plane's flight data recorder will run out of battery power by early next week. several planes and ships continuing to be in the ocean for signs of debris and british have a sub to help and it vanished on march 8 from a flight from kuala lumpur to beijing and 239 people on board. 230 workers from ups in new york city have been fired, surprising reason why they were handed their walking papers and wind up costing the shipping giant some big business. crowds take to the streets of madrid in protest and they say
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soda giant coca-cola is costing them jobs. and carrying a concealed weapon in illinois is legal but getting a permit to do so not exactly easy.
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♪ protesters in spain taking on american company coca-cola blaming it in part for the country's high unemployment and welcome back to al jazeera america i'm stephanie sy and unemployment in spain is currently 25%. we will have more on that in a minute but first the severe weather across the country, metrologist nicole mitchell is back. >> the storm system we have been seeing is doing a number on some of our temperatures so as we head off you can see the delineation and if you head to the central plains and this morning temperatures in the 40s ahead of that look at some temperatures in the south where we are in the warm sector and temperatures like 67 in birmingham or 72 in new orleans are the morning temperatures and that heat through the course of the day will help fuel some of those storms later today.
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so ahead of the front very warm. that air doesn't quite make it to the northeast today and the northeast will be under chances of rain and that will keep the temperatures down. so look at somewhere like new york and 47 versus washington d.c. and the warm sector at 63 degrees and much cooler today with snow in minneapolis and back to you. >> thousands of workers from 20 countries will gather in brussels and protesting the eu economic policies and calling for an into austerity measures and they say the cuts are not solving financial problems is spain. and as al jazeera phil reports some are blaming problems on one of america's most recognizable companies. >> reporter: yes, they are chanting the name of one of tomorrow best known soft drinks for the future prospects do not look near as palitable, workers have been laid off and got the letter today.
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it's not uncommon in today's spain. >> many companies with a profit are laying off many people and you have to know we are having the worst crisis in 70 years. >> translator: our main fear is being unprotected. the fear of not having a future or life plan. we have a 50% under 25 who will never have a pension. >> reporter: thousands marched through the spanish capitol on thursday, the latest protest was organized by the three main trade unions, and the noise was deafening and shouted as loud as they could, these are voices who feel they are not being heard. the protests are becoming more and more common not just in madrid but across spain. as far as the people are concerned their government has got its priorities the wrong way around and want to part the idea of paying the eu back, save that for another day and instead concentrate on that and concentrate on bringing unemployment and taxes down and making spain a better place to
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live. unemployment what's fallen by 1%. but it's still very high in this country sitting at 25%. that means more than 5 million people without work. and the oecd the organization for economic cooperation and development says spain's poorest are being hit harder here than any other place in the euro zone. >> translator: we have thousands of children going hungry, for the first time in decades in this country, the situation is one of collective poverty. >> reporter: and collective frustration and this led to a demo in the streets became a riot and anger is not in short supply here and the protest was much more peaceful, police stayed back, protesters made their point and not likely to stop until they see hope ahead. i'm phil with al jazeera madrid. >> spanish government says the reforms are working and it plans to reduce the public deficit to
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5.8% of the gross domestic product this year. 250 fired ups drivers are pleading their case to new york city officials and let go after walking off the job 90 minutes in february to protest a coworker's dismissal and say the company fired the long-time employee and union activist in a dispute over his work schedule. his coworkers staged the protest and this week the company responded to the walk out, 20 workers were fired on monday, another 230 got termination notices and will be fired once the company has trained their replacements. >> i'm scared. i'm hurt. i'm nervous. i'm angry. >> did you ever think you were going to lose your job over this? >> absolutely not. it was the furthest thing from my mind. >> reporter: u ps says the walk out violated the contract with the union and city officials are talking about cancelling contracts of millions of breaks on parking fines and they say if
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it happens the company may have to fire more employees at the queen's facility. federal government has reached a settlement with ail and gas company and agreed to pay $5 billion for the largest environmental cleanup in u.s. history. thousands of sites contaminated nor decades by chemical companies are targeted and justice department officials say mcgee tried to dodge paying for the cleanup by splitting up the company but the oil and gas operations which were sold to anadarko are still profitable and will have to pay. the word of the day on wall street is jobs, the monthly job reports is due out later this morning and expect hiring to pick up in march following a rough winter, they are predicting 200,000 new jobs added last month but that may not be enough to get the economy back on track. >> the u.s. economy really needs 7.5 million jobs to get to a prerecession unemployment rate at full labor market participation rates, that is slow progress of the current
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rate of hiring. you will not see a crazy increase to 300,000 jobs created per month but if you did and recovery would still be years and years away. >> reporter: we will have complete analysis of the jobs report when it's released around 8:30 eastern. on water street it's up 24 points up and the dow starting the day at 16572. the s&p 500 kicks off the day at 1888. the nasdaq is at 4237. overseas markets ending the day mostly lower but china rose three quarters of a percent and european markets are higher. gh responds to the deadly ignition recall. they hired crisis communications expert jeff eller and he was in the clinton white house and represented fire stone in the tire recall in 2000. the tax deadline is fast approaching and believe it or not some people have already gotten their refunds. but not everyone makes the best choices about what to do with that money.
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coming up, good advice from financial planners on how to spends it wisely. white house defending itself after reports it functioned a twitter like app for a government up rising in cuba but say there was nothing malicious about it. >> going up, that is a femur of an mamoth and probably bigger than you. >> little investors getting behind big projects, how a crowd funding website is making science dreams a reality. >> i'm john henry smith and can anybody beat the spurs and we have proof that, yes, somebody can.
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welcome back to al jazeera america i'm stephanie sy and these are the top stories at this hour, authorities identified 34-year-old ivan lopez in the fort hood shooting and he was an iraq war veteran with a history of mental health issues and taking medication for anxiety and depression and killed three people before
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taking his own life. the senate intelligence committee voted to declassify part of the cia report on interrogation tactics and it details the agency's detention program launched after 9/11 and talks about water boarding and techniques and questioning terror suspects. residents on chile coast are spending a second night outside and afraid to go inside after the earthquake that killed six people and the president has said her government will dwo everything it can to help rebuild communities. the u.s. is defending its creation of the so called cuban twitter, the white house said it was made as a way to redefine the balance of power between the state and cuban people but as daniel shows some view it as an american attempt to under mine the castro regime. >> reporter: they crave access to social media enjoyed by those in the rest of the world. a new report claims usaid wants
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to exploit that by setting up the service similar to twitter. according to the associated press it was done through a complicated system of front companies set up abroad to hide it from the cuban authorities. nothing sinister says washington. >> this was not an intelligence program. this was an effort, one of a variety of efforts that the united states engages in as part of its development mission to promote the flow of free information, to promote engagement by citizens of countries especially in sows that are nonpermissive. >> reporter: the idea is to build up a customer base using noncontroversial material before launching more politically provocative message and it was in havana in 2009 of the concert of the colombian singer. they were unaware the scheme was funded by the u.s. and in havana
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in the absence of diplomatic relations by this section. cubans would say there is nothing new in u.s. efforts to under mine its government. but the scope of these revelations goes beyond anything we have seen in recent years. the pressure on the u.s. presence here has suddenly grown dramatically. from cuban slang for the noise a humming bird makes was set up after a cuban telephone company employee leaked half a million customers records from one of the most tightly controlled communication systems in the world. >> it is one more example of what has been going on for 50 years. the u.s. is so obsessed with cuba it cannot stop trying to over throw it and trying to bring what it calls a democracy. >> reporter: usaid found it increasingly difficult to find suitable partners as the service grew and the funding of the scheme paying millions of dollars to the very authorities it was allegedly trying to
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undermine became unsustainable and by the middle of 2012 it disappeared. the political damage caused by the revelations will linger for a while longer. and i'm with al jazeera havana, cuba. >> reporter: american made app is not the only thing troubling cubans they were not aware american contractors running the program were also gathering personal data so it could be used later for political purposes. the fda has approved a new tool that could save the lives of people who overdose on painkillers and heroin, it's a hand-held automatic injector that contains nalaxone and it reverses the effects of an overdose and helps to restore a victim's breathing. according to federal statistics more than 16,000 people die from drug overdoses in 2010 and the new device is expected to be available this summer. april 15 is fast approaching for some taxpayers and means a
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financial wind fall will be on the way if it has not arrived already as chris reports many americans must now decide what to do with those tax refunds. >> sales of everything took a nice turn up in the month of march and analysts say some of that is because millions of americans started getting their tax refund checks from the irs. the average refund so far is close to $3,000. and surveys have found many if not most people are indeed spending it. and while retailers are loving it, financial advisors have other ideas. >> one of the best places to go if you do have a tax refund is to think about building your emergency fund. >> reporter: at morning star and others at bank rate.com and wallet hub put an emergency fund at the top of the financial to-do list. >> where it's a leaky roof, car repair, big medical bill, no matter what happens you will have some expense that you didn't bank on and it's good to set aside money so that you can
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defray those expenses as they occur. >> reporter: second on their list of what to do with tax refund money is pay down debt. >> especially high interest rate credit card debtor high interest rate student loan debt, best return on their investments very often will be by paying down that debt. >> reporter: they all say once you have done the responsible thing treat yourself to an splurge of 5-10% of the refund. >> reporter: chris is reporting there, experts suggest spending that tax refund check on maintenance projects around the house or starting a life insurance policy. after just ten days on the job mozillo-ceo is resigning and he is the cofounder of the company which developed a fire fox web browser but under pressure of support of proposition 8 which ban gay marriage in california in 2008 and the dating site launched aggressive campaign protesting his appointment and on thursday they said they are commits to a quality and free speech.
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people in illinois are now allowed to carry concealed weapons since the beginning of the year thousands have applied for permits and as diane esther brook said it's not an easy process and at a gun range in east dundee, illinois. >> they have to go through 16 hours of training which they then get certified and then apply for a license. now that is somewhat rigorous compared to some states. now what you have to go through if you want to get that license is you come in, you have several hours of classroom training which basically you learn about the concealed carry law, you learn how to properly holster a gun. then you go out on the shooting range which is where i am and you learn how to properly set up to shoot on the shooting range, handle the gun,.at a target and fire the firearm. i'm at gatt guns in east dundee, illinois, 30 miles from chicago and it has seen hundreds of people come through here since last october when people could
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start beginning these training classes and about a third of the people coming through have been women. they say who basically are looking perhaps for protection, maybe they live alone or go out to work and maybe they are in or traveling to an empty parking lot late at night and want protection. i talked to an instructor noell garcia some people opt not to get the license after all. >> if a threat is coming at you, if you are carrying a firearm for self protection, are you willing to take that person's life and some people are not, some people are, so i had students in the past that have said i do not want to carry conceal. >> so far illinois has given out about 24,000 licenses. it expects about 300,000-400,000 people to apply this year to get a license it takes anywhere after you complete the certification process and make the application, it takes anywhere from 3-4 months to get
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that license. >> diane esther brook and illinois was the last state to ban concealed weapons in public until a federal judge ruled that was unconstitutional and lawmakers changed the wall. ortiz is taking heat over a selfie and it was with the socks win in 2013 and he put it on twitter and tweeted thousands of times and samsung and white house is making it clear that president obama is not endorsing any of the company's products. the red sox star claims he wasn't looking for a plug and he took the picture with president obama because it was a once in a lifetime moment. three new york city sports talk radio hosts are also being criticized by some boomer and greg and mike franchesca mocked daniel merif i for taking paternity leave and murphy
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should have made sure his wife had a c-section so he could have been ready for opening day and he has three kids says he was back at work the next day after his wife gave birth and he missed the first few games of the season to be with his wife and newborn son. well, the longest winning streak in nba came to an end last night and john henry smith is here with details and thank goodness i was not asked for comment on that story. >> the only thing you can say is oh, well, everybody has to lose sometime. exactly. you know what has been great about the spurs 19 game win streak with a margin of victory of 17 points a game they were convincing and they won four games without one of their so called big three in the line up. tim duncan and tony parker are members of the big three. and he was out thursday night as the spurs played in oklahoma city and okc big one is kevin
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durant and the 39th straight game and a shoe in for the lead scoring title and thunder in the lead in the third and did not look back and he gets the ball ahead in the air to russell westbrook for the jam and thunder win 106-96 and the win streak ended 19 games and oklahoma city has taken all four games this season from the spurs. the only other nba game of the night dallas and la against griffin and the clippers and griffin messed around and got a triple double and 25 points, 10 pounds and 11 assists and 26 points and 11 boards and did not pass to get the triple double but when you can shoot like that why pass and dallas led by four in the final seconds and griffin is down and his teammates play and 113-107 and griffin is fine but in his words just clumsy. the most considerate thing outfielder josh redick has done
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is replace the shaving cream pies he throws in the face with whip cream pies and shaving cream in the eyes stings and trust me i know. two, the as had 23 walk off wins over the last two seasons. in oakland thursday night the a's were 2-1 to seattle and he got a hold of one annual and center and inside to parker and meant we were going to test the no blocking the plate rule and mike is out at home and they said he was not blocking the plate and take another look and seems to be a righteous call, man, a's rally to tie and send it to extra innings and chris shows us his pie face by launching the game winning walk off home run in the 12 and a's the first walk off and 3-2 over seattle. and toronto had not won in tampa since april of 2007 and they
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still have not. 7 strike outs from archer and 7 base hits and he had a 7th inning, 3 run home run and turned 2-1 ray advantage into a comfortable five run cushion and tied with carlos for most home runs in history 163 and tampa bay beat them 7-2 and split the four game series, florida, connecticut, kentucky, wisconsin are all in texas for the final four, i mean the college basketball teams, not the entire population of each state although it will probably seem like it this weekend and cherry jones at&t stadium, in one game florida will face the last team to beat them and kevin uconn and florida has won 30 straight since. >> they have been on a great roll since that time and we respect their program immensely and coming out with a victory, that is four months ago and they are a different team, we are a different team and they have
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some players that was hurt at the time. >> right after thanksgiving we traveled to stores and played uconn and a great game and learned a lot about ourselves. that early in the season, we are all trying to get to know our team better. to see how we respond against high-level competition. and you are also trying to get somewhat prepared for league play because you will go in difficult places to play. >> final four games happen tomorrow. that is the look at morning sports. >> shaving cream in the eye? >> stings like you don't know what. >> i guess that is one of the risks of having a shaved head. >> had to go there. >> john henry thank you. scientists say they may have found life-giving water in our solar system and believe there is a substantial ocean on the tiny moon that is around saturn and the ocean could be the size of lake superior is between the core and outside layer of fake
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ice and scientists want a space problem circling saturn for further study. congress debates how much money to spend on science research they want to go to everyday people to fund projects they care about. and we report on the crowd funding sites that hope to change the way research is funded. >> this is the big one that goes like this, 8.5 feet long. >> whoa. >> reporter: at the museum in seattle dr. christian entertains an investor, an investor who loves dinosaurs in general and triceratops in particular. >> and they had a beak. >> it's way bigger than my beak. >> this is the real thing. >> reporter: and she donated $5 to dr. 's proposal to dig up a triceratops in wyoming and did it through experiment.com and it allows anybody with a question and solid methodology to ask strangers for money for research
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into almost anything. the company's scientists that every proposed project before they put it on the website. >> biology and projects in medicine, space, ecology, social sciences, psychology. >> reporter: the doctor hit his modest fundraising goal which the company requires before anybody gets paid. and some 67 million-year-old bones that might not have been unearthed were. >> $2000 here or there to go and collect something like this makes a big deal for us. >> reporter: in return investors like lizzie get access to the process and he and his assistant blogged and posted pictures from the site and they will be invited to special events. >> it was exciting because everyday we will keep in mind what do we talk about or tell them today, what do they want to see. >> reporter: it may be a different kinds of research funding but it's a familiar start up story. this is world headquarters of experiment.com. >> and we just roll out of bed
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and get to work down here. >> reporter: a cramped office and living space and the company helped researchers find $600,000 in funding. the website and work site both growing beyond what cindy woo ever expected. >> six of us work there everyday. >> reporter: this is not just pure philanthropy, 8% of projects goes to the company and costs. mission driven for profit is what woo calls it. she wants to remake research funding, scientific collaboration and publishing. >> the bigger vision is to make science accessible to everyone in the world. >> reporter: we are going up. >> whoa. >> that is a femur of an mamoth and probably bigger than you. >> reporter: no project too big and no investor too small. allen with al jazeera seattle. >> reporter: some of the projects that have been funded include research on preventing diseases and studies on endangered animals and speaking of endangered animals they found
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a new frog species in vietnam and they are home to a diverse group of amphibians but may be in danger because it has the highest dedorestation rate on the planet and are called thorny tree frogs. ed sullivan theatre for the face of late-night television will be changing and david letterman announcing to the world he is ready to retire, when he plans to end the late-night hosting gig. and fracking is depending lesson foreign oil but what risk and we will tell you how the process works and critics say it's not safe. in our next hour a driver does the right thing, stopping to help after accidentally striking a young boy with his pickup and why he is now fighting for his own life after being beaten into a com
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success. >> you can work, you can do anything you want to. >> hop in as these courageous drivers take you on an inspiring journey. >> you don't like this country, get the hell out of here. >> driven an america tonight special series and don't miss the premiere of borderland, a ground breaking television event on al jazeera america
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♪ a live look at the iconic ed sullivan theatre in new york city is the current home of the late show with david letterman but the legendary talk show host will not be there much longer and that is coming up. welcome back to al jazeera america and benefits and risks of fracking but first let's look at where the snow and rain may fall in the country and metrologist nicole mitchell is back. >> a big storm and i want to get to that in a second but first we have more rain moving into the pacific northwest and i'm mentioning this because this once again is for some of the areas like the mudslide we recently saw in washington state and recovery going on. so not just again today but especially saturday and even into sunday more of the rain piling up so something we will have to monitor over the coming days. let's look at the big picture because look how much real estate the storm system is taking up in the central and now moving more in the eastern
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portion of the united states. so still this morning some very strong storms, this one has a history just yesterday into this morning of over 200 storm reports, the day before well over 150 storm reports. so this has been causing some problems. a lot of hail with this line of thunderstorms this morning. a lot of reports of high winds and wind damage even a couple isolated tornados that we have seen so watch this. you can really tell how heavy the rain is on the northern edge of all of this and a lot of warnings up this morning and anything from potential tornados to the severe thunderstorms that we have been watching. but you can see how much heavy rain there has been so places like illinois, now moving into indiana and that is causing flood concerns, if you don't know how deep the water is turn around. on the north side of this, already many places in minnesota reporting over 6" of snow but the up of michigan isolated spots could get as much as 2 feet before all of this clears
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out and a lot going on with the storm and back to you. >> nicole mitchell thank you. exxon is giving into pressure to disclose information about the environmental dangers of fracturening and will report the risk with the disposal of waste water and pollution and methane from wells and it's from new york funds which control $1 billion worth of exxon stock and new york city come troller scott stringer said corporate transparency in the arena is truly necessary for assessing risk and ensuring all stakeholders have the information they need to make informed decisions. there has been a lot of talk about fracking over the past few years but how does it actually work? our science and technology science jacob looks at the benefits of fracking and potential consequences. >> there is a fair amount of controversy and confusion around the use of hydraulic fracking but first we should probably define what it is. fracking is used in places where
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a company wants to pull oil or natural gas out of the earth but where that stuff is trapped inside a layer of earth or rock that is too pressurized to pull the oil or natural gas easily or cheaply using conventional methods and fracking involves drilling through the groundwater layer down to a depth of 5-20,000 feet like a mile, sometimes three miles below the surface and then the well changes direction and becomes horizontal. so at that point small cracks are broken in the surrounding rock with what's called a perforating gun and a mixture of water and sand is pumped at high pressure in the rock and the gun forms cracks along the length of the well and the water is pumped again and eventually the area around the well is basically forced to become porous and ready to give up gas or oil and the water is pulled back out and oil or gas follows after it until the horizontal pipe has a steady supply of oil or gas
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flowing in the well but there are several problems and one is fracking take as lot of water. incredible amount from 1-5 million gallons per well. it can be 8 millions over the life of the well. another is that even though the process uses a comparatively small amount of chemicals and 1% of fluid involved the chemicals involve money car sin -- carcinogins and should be sealed off from aquifers and they do not force them to reveal all the chemicals they are using so testing for those chemicals is limited. we just don't know all the chemicals to test for. and finally the incredible force of fracking can trigger tiny seismic events and earthquakes and one began outside of youngstown, ohio and between january 2011 and february 2012 and youngstown which never had a recorded earthquake in history
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had 109 small earthquakes and six were felt by the local population and one was 3.9 on the rikter scale and it's that seismic fracking connection that has experts worried. >> literally moving the earth, al jazeera tech reporter jacob ward reporting. state inspectors in ohio shut down another fracking operation following a series of small earthquakes last month and they were centered near 7 oil and natural gas wells owned by hill energy a houston-based company. 40 years ago two paintings were left at a train station in italy and auctioned and bought for 100 for the pair but we report the owner discovered the paintings are stolen art worth millions. >> after four decades hanging on a kitchen wall. [applause] they are on show and getting attention and snatched from a london home in 1917 and abandoned on a train from paris.
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>> translator: after they were found having no idea of their value they were put up to auction and bought by a working man who was an art lover and hung the paintings in the kitchen. >> reporter: that is where they stayed until the man's son wanted to near more about them and ended up contacting police and his dad had been sitting on a gold mine because this is by a french artist. >> translator: the value of the painting experts can definitely give a better answer but it is a painting that is $13 million and could reach more than $40 million. >> reporter: such a sign for police that they were showing them off and italy has taken a lead role in the fight against art smuggling and there is a special police unit set up to investigation stolen art and solve the mysteries of missing treasurers like these. >> the police are currently holding on to the paintings while they decide what to do with them.
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another change coming to late-night tv and could spell the end of stupid pet tricks in the top ten list and he announced he is retiring as the host of the long time running show on cbs. >> we do not have the timing down and it will be at least a year or so but in the time in the not too distant future, 2015 for the love of god,, in fact, paul and i will be wrapping things up and taking a night. [applause] thank you. thanks to everybody. >> reporter: not easy shoes to fill. no word yet from cbs on who will fill that time slot. in february jimmy fallon replaced jay leno as a host on the tonight show and del has more. >> i get the feeling that was a spur of a moment decision and this is what we are following this morning, investigators trying to find the motive behind the shooting in texas, new
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information surfaces about what set off the gunman. a senate panel voting to declassify documents that would reveal cia secrets about interrogating suspects but a while before we know the extent of the documents. severe weather leaving a path of destruction in the u.s. and have funnel clouds and hail as it made its way east. >> i'm nicole mitchell and the same system causing severe weather is creating flooding and a snowstorm this morning, i'll have that forecast. >> also in the next hour scientists say a major earthquake could hit california in the coming years and technology that could save lives by giving an early warning before the big one and a city with a rather unique past getting a make over after years of neglect. >> al jazeera news continues, i'm stephanie sy in new york and del and i are back with you in 2 1/2 minutes on the latest of the fort hood shooting and more news. ♪
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>> scared as hell... >> as american troops prepare to leave afghanistan get a first hand look at what life is really like under the taliban. >> we're going to be taken to a place, where they're going to make plans for an attack. >> the only thing i know is, that they say they're not going to withdraw. >> then, immediately after, an america tonight special edition for more inside and analysis. >> why did you decide to go... >> it's extremly important for the western audience to know why these people keep on fighting... ...it's so seldom you get that access to the other side. >> faultlines: on the front lines with the taliban then an america tonight: special edition only on al jazeera america
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>> there may have been a verbal altercation with another soldier or soldiers. >> the moments before the latest fort hood shooting, what investigators are saying about the shooter's state of mind. [ alarm ] >> earthquake. >> it's called the holy grail of earthquake research, technology honed to predict a quake before it happens. >> tornadoes, hail and flooding slamming the nation's
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midsection, where that storm system is headed next. >> the results were shocking. >> declassifying a report on c.i.a. interrogation tactics. some say it reveals extreme abuse, while others call it a witch hunt. >> good morning, welcome to al jazeera america. i'm stephanie sy. >> i'm del walters. military officials identified ivan antonio lopez as the fort hood smoother. >> investigators say the iraq war convenient was taking medication for anxiety and depression, but a psychiatric evaluation last month suggested he was not prone to violence. >> they're trying to figure out just why lopez went on his shooting rampage. we have tracked developments from texas. we're learning more about the man who turned the army outpost upside down. >> investigators say there's a strong possibility that he argued with one or more soldiers
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shortly before the shooting and he was upset about only being granted a 24 hour leave to attend his mom's funeral, something investigators are looking into as they try to figure out what led to this. by all accounts, no one account predict the violence by an experienced soldier who spent nearly half his life in the military. the army's top brass discussed lopez's experience and military record. >> that this was an experienced soldier, he spent nine years in the puerto rico national guard before coming on active duty, so he's a very experienced soldier. >> he had a clean record in terms of his behavioral, no outstanding bad marks for any kinds of major misbehaviors that we are yet aware of. >> but as officials look for a motive as to what would cause this husband and father to go on a shooting rampage that killed
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three people and wounded 16 ears. it's his mental stability and actions leading up to the shootings that may yield some clues. we have very strong evidence that he had a medical history that indicates unstable psychiatric or psychological condition. i've gone through all the records to ensure that that is in fact correct and we believe that to be the fundamental underlying causal factor. >> lopez had seen a military psychiatrist as late as last month where he was being treated for depression and anxiety and he was taking sleep medication. in 2011, he served four months of duty in iraq. while he never saw cam both and no record of injuries, military officials said told his supervisors that he suffered from a traumatic brain injury and was being evaluated for post traumatic stress disorder. investigators are also examining the possibility that lopez may have had an argument with one or more soldiers in the minutes leading up to the shooting. >> we do not have that
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definitively, but have strong indications of that. >> meanwhile, his wife is said to be cooperating with the f.b.i., helping them to understand her husband's state of mind. even back at their apartment complex, a short distance from fort hood, neighbors say there was no indication of the shooting that was to come. >> i saw him at lunch, you know, and he seemed perfectly fine, and it's mind-blowing, really. >> ok. we've also been updated on the conditions of the victim witness nine of the most seriously victims, three upgraded from critical to serious condition. dell. >> brandon, i understand we're getting more information this morning about the gun that lopez used. >> yes, we are. you know, we actually found that he purchased the gun at a gun store about 10 minutes away and the same store sold a gun to
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nalal hassan back in 2008 when he went on a shooting rampage. >> authorities are looking to set up a fake bond in the neighborhood in killeen texas. neighbors were evacuated over the suspicious device attached to the bottom of a truck. the bomb squad discovered it was a hoax. >> we're going to take a closer look at how this attack by a potentially disgruntled soldier compares to other related shootings. >> residents spent another night in chili sleeping outside. the earthquake measuring 8.2 on the richter scale left two people dead. strong after shocks are still being felt. >> a boat flying through the air in the port. one of dozens of fishing vessels that can no longer float in the water. >> we were 200 meters out on the
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dock when the earthquake struck, crashing the boat on to the pier. now my arms are crossed. i can't work to feed my family. >> in fact, no one is out fishing. the port is closed, and in any case, there's no ice to keep the catch fresh, i'm told. it's been three days since a massive earthquake brought the port city of half a million people to a standstill and patience is wearing thin. >> this water is only good enough for the toilet, the woman complains. >> nearby, hundreds of merchants from neighboring bolivia who regularly come to the port to buy merchandise are stranded, many penniless. the only road to the border is blocked by a landslide. >> i've never had this experience before. we don't have earth quakes in bolivia. what i want to go home. >> there have been hundreds of
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after shacks, at least one almost as strong as the earthquake and so residents of this neighborhood are taking to the hills. diego shows us the structural damage to his flat, the worst in his son's bedroom. >> we're sleeping outside in a tent. we're afraid the flat will collapse on top of us, because the main pillars of the building of bent. it's too dangerous. >> thousands of homes are damaged. the government is just beginning to assess the destruction and plan a strategy to help the victims. no longer willing to wait for the road to open, these bow live convenients are walking to the border, 450 kilometers away. >> a couple of smaller earthquakes striking california, a 3.1 magnitude quake felt in malibu a 3.7 striking the town in napa valley.
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>> many believe california is due for a much larger earthquake. a new warning system is designed to give people at advanced notice before the big one hits. >> in los angeles, it seems everyone's talking about the big one. >> i wish sometimes that people would just stop talking about it, you know, like they say, don't say, you know, because it will come to you. >> seismologists say it's not just the stuff of legend, a major earthquake is almost certain to rattle the landscape of southern california in the next 30 years. >> it could be a deadly magnitude 7.5 quake along one of the many smaller fault lines here, like the hills which run under the los angeles skyline and a population of 4 million. even that is not the nightmare scenario. >> the nightmare scenario would be a very large reputure. it's going to affect millions of people in southern california.
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the last one of the 157 years ago, the last in the north 1906. >> we always have to be prepared for anything. you never know when it's going to happen or when it's going to occur. >> scientists don't know if it's possible to see an even more catastrophic scenario with one quake striking along the hundreds of miles, running the length of california. predicting quakes has always been the seismologists holy grail. >> scientists believe that predicting earthquakes is fundamentally impossible. here in california, we're sure that we're going to go through a big one anytime soon. >> the u.s. geological survey is testing a new early warning system, minor quakes rattled the landscape hundreds of times each year. there were 200 in the past two weeks alone.
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make that 201. [ alarm ] >> earthquake. >> this one happened during our interview. >> this was our early warning system. we got about five or six seconds warning. >> that might help in smaller quakes but if the big one hits l.a., a few seconds warning might be just long enough to say goodbye. aljazeera, los angeles. >> they are on the ring of fire, plates deep under the earth's surface bump into each other. >> weather moving through missouri 11ing downed trees, damaged homes and power outages, one touching down causing damage to hundreds of homes. the governor declaring a state of emergency. there was hail the size of the baseballs in texas.
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in arkansas, fallen tree limbs knocking out power in the western parts of that state. >> while the threat is somewhat diminishing, we could see a more severe weather today. >> we have the latest. it is spring and severe weather. >> it is that time of year. less the time of year of snow, we have to talk about that, too. you can just see it coming down. you were talking about some of the hail out there, reports of stuff as big as grape fruits in some cases. this is texas up to missouri and illinois. it's been a widespread taj area. i'll show you that in a minute. when you look at this, you know that some auto body shops are going to be happy doing a lot of work in the near future. >> st. louis, we've had flood concerns. not only has this brought tornado damage, hail, trees down from high winds, but flooding is a big concern, indiana and ohio start to go get into that as the heavy rain moves allege. as we continue and look at the
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broader picture today, this is a widespread storm from the snow in the north to the severe in the south. here's what we've had already this morning. you can see the line coming along the last two dice, about 400 different reports of severe weather. most of the that has been hail, but look at this morning, the line that's been going through mississippi and into alabama. that's been wind damage reports, so watch for trees down, power lines down, things of that nature. then, with this line that we're watching, still the potential, still under a tornado watch, that doesn't mean that it's imminent right now, but something you need to be prepared for if you hear sirens go off. to the fort side of this, we're seeing the heavy rain. the severe storm risk through the day, but on the north side, it's the winter storm that we're watching, places such as ashland, wisconsin, close to a foot of snow at this point and it's still coming down. you can see that corridor of heavy rain through the ohio river valley, so really, a lot
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of elements we need to watch out for as the storm moves around. >> the search for malaysia airlines flight 370 is becoming a race against time, searching underwater for the plane's black box today. it will run out of battery power possibly by early next week. several planes and ship continue to comb the indian ocean for debris. the british ever lent a nuclear submarine to help. the flight vanished traveling from cool lamb purr to beijing. >> it appears that anti-government protestors in venezuela are clashing with police instead of taking up an offer of dialogue with the government. as we report, the opposition have their reasons. >> they've been protesting for nearly two months, students at the central university of caracas try to cross police lines to send the government a message. they went immediate changes in
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economic policy. >> when we graduate, we won't have jobs. we want to send proposals because they always say we are destablizing the country. >> they say there is no place for talks with the government until police stop repression. the president has been proposing a dialogue since december to tame down discontent. >> these people don't believe the call for dialogue, because the president has called them cowards. >> protests have left third nine dead, hundreds wounded and dozens arrested. >> the opposition sabotaged talks especially the violent sectors who tried unsuccessfully to out of the the government. >> the vatican has offered to help both sides come to an understanding, but it could be
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complicated as bishops known to be critical of the government said the president is seeking a totalitarian rule. members of political opponents say they are open to talk if the vatican mediates. first the government must free politician lopez immediately, and repression and disarm pro government militants. >> there's no way the venezuelan people are going to believe that there's true willingness to move along in any dialogue if toxic gas is being thrown throughout our cities. >> members of the union of south american nations who met in caracas last week said both sides should stop the violence and moderate their language. they'll meet in caracas on monday to once again try to bring both sides to the negotiating table.
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>> the catholic church accused the president of trying to repress that opposition. >> we'll talk about business owners struggling to survive, chaos going on for decades. >> it chronicles a stain on our history that must never be allowed to happen again. >> the senate votes to declassify a c.i.a. report so americans can decide for themselves if interrogation practices like waterboarding amounted to abuse. >> our big number of the day is 5,150,000,000. >> what one company did to have to pay that record fine.
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>> this is a live look at the storm damage in hopkins county, texas where power outages in that severe system tore through the area, a lot of people still in the dark. >> that storm is not over. good morning, welcome to al jazeera america. >> straight ahead, businesses are trying to stay afloat in
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ukraine in a culture of corruption. that may be the understatement. >> first let's get a look at temperatures across the nation today with nicole mitchell. >> that's been an element of this system, when you get the strong storms, you want some of that warm air helps fuel the high dewpoints, as well. the temperature map you can see the contrast between the coal and warm. the warmest temperatures is where we have the weather this morning. birmingham at 67 and storms rolling through this region, that's help to go fuel it. >> today as the front moves on, the warm air gets mid through the atlantic, not quite to the northeast. you're going to see quite a temperature contrast, new york at the 40's with a chance for rain. d.c. is at 63, but that's also where our biggest chance for the severe storms will be where we still have the warm air, cold
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air, it's the winter storm. >> russia has arrested 25 ukrainians suspected of plotting attacks in southern and central russia, described by russia as members of ultra naggist movements. ukraine state security service is calling the charges nonsense, following accusations by ukraine that russia security staff assisted the movement which killed more than 100 people. >> interim prime minister yatsenyuk said ukraine calls the seizing of the region a crime. >> 8,000 soldiers staying behind, applying for permission to join the russian army. >> planning to set up a business in ukraine, well here's a step
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di step guide. first, get to grips with the mountain of permits you'll need issued and renewed each year, then be prepared to sweat as you pay plenty of money to smooth all the way. this is the experience of one game owner and entrepreneur who told me it's the norm. he preferred not to be identified. >> yes, i've paid bribes, sometimes i have to pay consultation fees, just to speed the process of obtaining permits. otherwise, they can take up to a year or two. >> in 2013, the corruption watchdog trains pattern international described ukraine as the most corrupt country in europe. ukrainians were shown exactly what that means when their former leaders excesses were laid bare at the yanukovych country estate. aside from the astonishing
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extravagance, private zoo, golf course, solid gold loaf of bread, piles of paperwork were discovered that make up what is known as yanukovych leaks detailing a system of corruption unlike anything ukraine has seen before. >> they say crops practices stem back decades, so endemic, it could take more than a revolution and new government to correct it. >> obviously, it was a shock for all of the ukraine, learning a lesson about how not to conduct your life. it's a good lesson for all people in power that if they lead their lives like yanukovych did, they will end up the same way he did. >> back at the game, the strain of doing business in ukraine shows. >> the amount that you have to pay for various ridiculous documents and permits constitute a large part of your expenses. sometimes you have to pay so much that a business isn't profitable at all.
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>> correction, some people do make lots of money, but generally, at the expense of others. aljazeera, kiev. >> the international monetary fund recently agreeing to give ukraine an $18 billion loan, that money coming with man dates to implement economic and government reforms. >> some are saying those are going to be painful reforms for folks in ukraine. >> today's big number, ticking up, $5.15 billion, the amount anna darko petroleum paid. >> they originally wanted $15 billion stemming from pollution left behind by the corporation anna darko acquired. >> here's how the settlement is split up, 88% of the money toward cleanup cost at plants, the remaining 12% toward health
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claims. >> the word is jobs on wall street, the month unemployment report out in about an hour. it is expected to pick up following a rough winter. forecast is 200,000 new jobs added. >> if you look at prime age workers, 25-54, the share those workers employed fell 9.4% during the cries and only a third of that ground's been made up. that's really the indicator that people should be looking at. >> we'll have complete analysis of the jobs report when it's released around 8:30 eastern. >> ahead of that key jobs report, wall street looks poised to open higher right now, the dow up 23 points, starting at 16572, the s&p kicks off at 1888, the nasdaq at 4237. overseas, asia ending mostly lower, and european markets
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higher. >> we will find out today if investors are hungry for a piece of grub hub, the on line food delivery company making its debut on the new york stock exchange. it will trade under the ticker grub. $26 a share gives the company a value of $2 billion. >> bank of america may be closer to a settlement over its credit card practices, reports saying the bank would pay more than $800 million to settle allegations, regulators claiming customers were forced to sign up for extra credit card products. >> mcdonald's shutting down in crimea, this is the second international company to alter its operations in crimea after it was annexed. no big macs in crimea. >> as if they haven't been through enough already. >> now that is something to fight about. >> soldiers return to their
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posts after the shoot be at ford hood. >> the warning signses that could prevent a similar attack in workplaces. >> every ncaa tournament has breakout stars, we talk to a player who will try to keep his huskies dancing all all the way to a championship.
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>> good morning, welcome back to aljazeera america. i'm del walters. >> i'm stephanie sy. did he classifying that report on the c.i.a.'s interrogation
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practices, some have called torture. they say the american people can decide. >> a lot of people want to know whether or not the c.i.a. went further. we'll talk about a driver beating unconscious after accidentally hitting a child that stepped into the street. that man now fights for his life. >> in the next hour, the labor department releasing its latest job report, we will help break down the numbers. >> it may indicated the economy is moving in the right direction. >> authorities identifying the fort hood shoot be gunman as an iraqi war veteran with a history of mental health issues, view van lopez. he killed three people before taking his own life. we have more from killeen, texas on this developing story. >> in the wake of the deadly
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attack, investigators and so many in this grieving community continue this morning to search for answers. >> it's hard to understand that someone would be out, you know, just be able to shoot, you know, people they work with. >> military officials believe the army specialist ivan lopez chose victims at random after an argument with fellow soldiers. >> there's a strong possibility that that fact immediately preceded the shooting. we do not have that definitively at this point, but do have strong indications of that. >> as the shots rang out. >> we have multiple gunshot victims. >> on a post filled with combat veterans, many came to help. >> there was hero. >> >> the military police woman who confronted him before he turned his weapon on himself, an army chaplain injured jumping into
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the line of fire. >> individuals took control of the situation, broke a window and got them out to safety. >> there were three soldiers who did not escape, including sergeant timothy owens. >> very proud of him, because he was fighting for our country. >> the 10 year army veteran served in iraq and kuwait but did not survive an attack at home. >> to say unspeakable senseless violence happen in a place where they're supposed to feel safe, home base, is tragic. >> a tragedy investigators admit they may never fully understand. >> reporting from killeen, texas there. a leading expert in threat and crisis management analyzing cases of assaults, hostage takings and murder in the workplace, mr. barton, thank you
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for being with us this morning. how does the handling of a workplace shooting at a military installation differ from a civilian workplace? >> every day in the united states on average, every workday, about two people are killed at work either by a coworker or a former coworker, so that is a pretty numbing statistic, but it's actually been flat for about 16 years. in terms of the military, naturally the access to weapons is so much more profoundly an issue and more importantly, the issues of emotion, in this case, obviously someone who had severe emotional distress. in the workplace, it's e.a.p., we have a human resources department. in the military, it's much more difficult to say to a commanding officer i'm struggling. it's a stigma and society is still struggling with that. >> what you're alluding to is the culture of the military.
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i interviewed the mayor of killeen, texas yesterday who said the same thing. these are soldiers in many cases trained to use a weapon and to kill and they have been in many cases in war zones, but you think there's also this additional stigma of coming forward if you have emotional issues? >> what's interesting is specialist lopez never saw action. this is not someone who is out there actively as a soldier on the front lines. i think there is a lot to be said for the culture of any workplace, and yes, in the military, the fact is it is difficult to come forward, but we still have a thousand, 1,000 soldiers a week in the united states coming forward saying i do have p.t.s.d. candidly, they're not looking for some type of out. they need help, whether medication or some type of leave of absence. this soldier was given a very brief leave of absence when his mother died, only a day. sometimes compassion is what we
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want to give but difficult given where they work. >> you teach workplace violence prevention at f.b.i. academy. do you think this incident at fort hood could have been avoided? >> i don't, only in the rewards that any place, we have tomorrow there have been shootings inside the pentagon, c.i.a., inside of large corporate environments, large corporate parks. we want to say sure it could have been, but if someone has capacity, opportunity and mental health, these incidents are really not preventable. what we can do is mitigate them, tries to let's help these people get into therapy, support, leave of absence, try to get them out of an environment that they're unhappy with. >> some people would say given he was depressed, maybe he shouldn't have been allowed to carry a firearm for example. >> well, the firearm he used apparently was his own and that
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of course is a whole different issue, because then we're talking about using a military weapon or his own, and that's also a very profound question. i'm still a huge believer that we have a lot of veterans that need support. we need the v.a. to step up. we need a deep inquiry of what's going on in fort hood. it is unusual to have this many incidents at the same time. >> sir, thanks so much. >> a journalist working for the associated press has been killed in afghanistan, that taking place near the border with pakistan. a unit commander shot and killed her. she died on the spot. he also shot the a.p. canadiens. they were reporting on elections which begin tomorrow. the taliban is targets candidate selection sites and offices. last month, an afghan journalist was killed along with eight others when the taliban attacked
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a luxury hotel in kabul. >> the senate intelligence committee did he classifying the agencies interrogation and detention program after the 9/11 attacks. this could be the most definitive accounts so far of what the c.i.a. did. >> did the c.i.a. cross the line using bear boarding and other techniques to interrogate terror suspects after 9/11 and did it work? is this how the u.s. tracked down osama bin laden and prevented other attacks? we may soon know. the senate intelligence committee voted 11-3 thursday to give the public a look at the summary of its 6200 page report. >> results, i think, were shocking. it chronicles a stain on our history that must never be allowed to happen again. this is not what americans do. >> even republicans who voted for disclosure questioned whether this report is accurate.
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there are no direct interviews with the c.i.a. or anyone in the bush administration. no republicans joined the investigation. they thought it was biased. >> i was never in favor of this report being done. i think it was a waste of time. the general public can make up their minds about whether or not this was done properly. >> the c.i.a. claims the committee accessed information without being authorized. committee chair dianne feinstein accused the c.i.a. of spying on the investigation. now it's up to president obama how soon this report goes public. >> he would expect that the actions that are necessary to declassify a document like that be conducted in all due haste. >> that's tracy pots reporting. the co director of the liberty and national security program at new york universities center for justice joins us. thanks for being with us this morning. the big truth that may come out of this report is we may find out that the c.i.a. went much
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further than watergateing. what is out there in the stratosphere as far as the spheres what the c.i.a. may have done. >> one is the sort of detailing of the techniques that the c.i.a. has used, waterboarding that there have been reports in the washington reports particularly that other techniques were used which were violent and quite brutal on detainees. the second thing that is important is that the c.i.a. claimed all along that these techniques were effective. that's been a big part of the debate around torture and what has been claimed in the press and people who leaked bits of this report is that the report shows definitively that that's not the case. >> we were of the opinion that up until possibly the release of this report, waterboarding was as bald as it got. when you say the washington post is reporting other techniques, what other techniques
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specifically are we hearing about? >> there's one in particular which they reported, a kind of variant on waterboarding, dunking somebody in ice water so that they think they're drowning, pulling them out and dunking them in ice water and pulling them out and banging them against the wall. i think there are variants on what we have heard about rather than new techniques. there will be some detail that we don't know already. >> the last report was the church report when the c.i.a. showed what it did in the 1950's. there's always a sense that the c.i.a. i guess going to give more than it actually does. much is going to be redacted, in fact sometimes entire pages. are you optimistic that the c.i.a. is going to let us know what really happened? >> some people already know what happened, particularly the senate intelligence committee and white house. the c.i.a. knows what happened and they've been trying to keep it secret for a long time.
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i think at this moment, there's a huge amount of public pressure, both on the white house and on the c.i.a. to really come clean about these excesses of the war on terror so that we know and we don't repeat the same mistakes in the wake of 9/11. >> there are holdovers from the bush administration that are going to come out regardless of what is reds and say this is what we had to do to keep america safe in the days following 9/11, and that if given the chance, they would do it again. will anything change? >> i think things will change. as i said, you know, one of the big conclusions of the senate report, based on reporting, obviously haven't seen it, is that it shows that the torture techniques used by the c.i.a. were not effective and that in a number of instances, the c.i.a. actually exaggerated how effective these techniques were, so that's a very important part of the debate, whether or not torture is effective, kind of a
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sad comment. >> there's an argument some say they didn't work at all. >> exactly. that's what the senate report is so important for, because that has been such a big part of the claim of people like former vice president cheney that this is what we had to do. well, if what you thought you had to do wasn't effective, that teaches a lesson for the future that is very important. >> thank you for being with us this morning. >> the u.s. is defending the creation of the site to secure unrest in cuba. the obama administration denies the program was in tended to be covert, saying the app was a discreet form of humanitarian assistance. >> this was not an intelligence program. this was an effort, one of a variety of efforts that the united engages in as part of its
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development to promote the flow of free information, promote engagement by citizens of countries and societies that are non-per missive. >> the american made app isn't the only thing troubling cubans. they were not aware american contractors running the program were also gathering personal data to be used late for political hours. >> a detroit driver was attacked by a mob after he accidentally hit a young boy and now is in a coma. this is surveillance video you're watching here of the crash that sparked the violence. you can see in the distance the 10-year-old boy stepping off the boy and getting hit by the pickup truck. the driver got out of his car to check on the boy. that's when the group of men came after him. >> i did see it happening. my concern honestly was on david. then, i thought they had stopped. i'm not 100% sure. again, my whole thing was on my god son at that time.
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>> the boy has a broken leg. the driver is currently being treated at detroit hospital for brain injuries and no one has been arrested so far. >> 40 years ago, two paintings were left at a train station in italy, auctioned off and bath for $100 for the pair. the owner has since found out the paintings were stolen and worth millions. >> after four decades hanging on a kitchen wall, these matter pieces back on show and getting attention. they were snatched from a london home in 1970 and abandoned on a train traveling from paris. >> after they were found, having no idea of their value, they were put up to auction and bought by a working man who was an art lover. the owner hung these paintings in a kitchen. >> that's where they stayed, until the man's son wanted to know more about them and contacted police. his dad had been sitting on a goad mine, because this is a piece by french post
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impressionist, and his contemporary. >> the value of the painting, experts can definitely give a better answer but starts approximately at $13 million and could reach more than $40 million. >> sump a find for italian police that cultural minister was showing them off. italy's taken a lead role in the fight against art smuggling, there's even a special police unit set up to investigate stolen art, and solve the mysteries of missing treasures like these. >> italian police are currently holding on to the paintings while they figure out just what they want to do with them. >> i go shopping all the time for things like that and mind end up being junk. let's look at headlines. the boston globe reporting a massive sea on the inside of one of saturns moons the size of lake superior. >> they've known this since 2005 when the first pictures were
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captured but now confirmed it. whenever we think of water on other planets, we think of the possibility of life. "u.s.a. today" is reporting on that white house now objecting to the selfie, the big papi. the white house objects to attempts to use the president's likeness for special purposes. >> me thinks they protest too much. not really that big a deal. >> it's just a selfie. >> in the daily news, a mets player daniel murphy taking the high road after the debate for him taking maternity leave. he took a few days off because he felt he needed to take paternity leave to be with his new wife and child, but he is getting lit up by some sports
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analysts, one actually saying she should have had a c-section so the baseball season could start. >> a lot of women are not happy with that. i have so much respect for boomer, it was sad to hear. >> i think if boomer thinks about it, he will take it back, because that was pretty dumb. >> i wonder if john henry smith has anything to say about it. these days, college basketball's biggest stars head to the nba after one or two seasons and that's what you're hear to talk about. >> the maternity issue, i took plea days off when my baby was born and i wish i'd taken off a week. >> you miss a couple games, whatever. >> exactly. it's all a game at the end of the day, it's all our jobs. we like our jobs, but we like our families, too, just saying. >> the most surprising member of this year's final four, the huskies a seven seed coming into the tournament and not eligible
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for postseason play last year. as ross shimabuku tells us, they are led by a senior, an inspiration to his teammates. >> the last time the u conn huskies won the championship, he was a freshman. since then, they have had a tumult with us run, losing jim calhoun to retirement, last year, the team ineligible for postseason play due to poor academic performance, the big hearted napier decided to stay in school. >> i felt the university stayed loyal to me and i wanted to do the same. they needed for me to do a lot of things and i never regret my decisions. >> throughout his tenure at the university of connecticut, napier's mason made important decisions, takano with the idea of transferring but remained with the huskies. after his junior year, the 6'1"
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guard instead decided to full full a promise he made to his mother. >> it really emphasizes staying to get a degree. he will get a degree. he has a chance to win the national championship. >> while honoring his promise to earn a degree, the roxbury massachusetts native also honed skills on the court and grew into the leader that drivers this husky team. >> the biggest thing is my maturity, leadership skills, the in tangibles, trying to be the best person i can be every day. you're going to go through mishappens. when adversity hits, it shows you who you are, you can fold or just stand up and fight, you know and i think i learned that, you know, through my years at university of connecticut. >> he led the team. you can see him talking, you can see his swagger, his positive organarrogance about how good w.
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>> he's a great leader, we need him. >> you should see it on the court. it's like he's a superstar. he's our lebron. >> that wasless shim reporting. the huskies have another tall task ahead of them, tipping against the florida gators with a ticket to the national championship game on the line. they'll have their work cut out for them. >> we wish them well. that is a big task. >> absolutely. >> it is a race against time in indonesia. >> a city built more than 350 years ago is falling into ruins and so are we to restore them to their former glory. >> why members of one community are being warned to be vigilant and get vaccinated. download it now
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>> a city with 350 years of history getting a face lift trying to return its old glory. welcome back to aljazeera america. >> first let's look at rain and snow. meteorologist nicole mitchell is back. >> widespread system. for the next couple days in that mud slide area with the recovery going on, more rain through the weekend. that's going to be a trouble maker here. you could easily pick out the widespread system. i'll have more on the severe element coming up in a few minutes. a major snowstorm, we expect severe weather this time of year, a snowstorm, the second one in a week for minnesota, wisconsin reports of over a foot of snow, high winds bringing down trees. >> the f.d.a. approved a new
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hand held automatic injector to help overdoses. it reverses the effects and restores a victim's breathing. according to federal reports, more than 16,000 people die from drug overdoses in 2010. this new device is expected to be available this summer. >> health officials in the los angeles area are concerned about a dangerous form of meningitis, eight people diagnosed this year, three have died. gay men who are h.i.v. positive appear to be the group most affected by the outbreak. health officials urge men at high risk to get vaccinations. >> it was once considered to be the crown jewel of asia but indonesia's capitol jakarta has fallen into neglect, most of the historic areas fading away. they are trying to restore it back to its former glory. >> the dutch established the
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capitol 350 years ago, calling it batavia. over the years, it's fallen on hard times, run down and neglected. while some buildings are beyond rare, this archeologist argues it's not too late to save ears. he said the old city should be a symbol of pride. >> at the beginning for a long time, there was no result, but now the government is serious and i have no hope all my dreams and the dreams of everyone who wants this town restored will come true. >> the local government has started a restoration project. it wants to clean up the area and attract tourists, so it's spending over $12 million to help owners restore homes and businesses. most of the buildings here are privately opened. >> there's a team that will see whether the building is good enough to be renovated, then the government will give the owners in septemberives, tax breaks and work together to maintain them
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so it's not all left up to the owner. >> one of them has had a shop here for 30 years with his family. he said with government help, they will renovate their home. >> it's possible to renovate this area. there's a few examples in singapore. they renovate whole towns and now it looks very good. >> even though it's in a terrible condition, there's a real sense of history here. in the early 19th century, the dutch government managed a vast training emspire from these old colonial buildings. >> from here, spices, cloth, tea and coffee loaded on to ships and sent around the world. this old harbor is going to be restored and when it's all done, it's hoped indonesians and visitors will be able to imagine what it was like all those years
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ago. aljazeera, jakarta. >> it is the center for the economy and politics, home to 8 million people, the largest city in southeast asia. 80% of the population there is muslim. >> big changes for late night t.v. jimmy fallon replaced jay leno, david letterman now retiring. >> we don't have the timing of this precisely down. it will be, i think at least a year or so, but sometime in the not too distant future, 2015 for the love of god, in fact, paul and i will be wrapping things up and taking a hike. thank you, thanks, everybody. >> big shoes to fill. we are looking right now as a live shot of he had sullivan theater on
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broadway. >> we'll talk about the changing of the guard in our next hour. >> investigators still trying to find the motive behind the mass shooting at fort hood texas, saying the gunman may have argued with other soldiers right before the attack. >> a senate panel voting to declassify a document about c.i.a. secrets. >> severe weather dumping hail and rain across the midwest, spawning funnel clouds moving east. >> the u.s. job market looking to heat up after a very long winter. we examine the march jobs report. >> historic elections in afghanistan this week, the influence american foreign policy may have on the vote as the people decide the road ahead for their country.
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>> the same storm system causing severe weather creating flooding, even a snowstorm this morning. i'll have the forecast. >> the aljazeera morning news continues. back in two minutes, have a great friday morning. >> scared as hell... >> as american troops prepare to leave afghanistan get a first hand look at what life is really like under the taliban. >> we're going to be taken to a place, where they're going to make plans for an attack. >> the only thing i know is, that they say they're not going to withdraw. >> then, immediately after, an america tonight special edition for more inside and analysis. >> why did you decide to go... >> it's extremly important for the western audience to know why these people keep on fighting...
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...it's so seldom you get that access to the other side. >> faultlines: on the front lines with the taliban then an america tonight: special edition only on al jazeera america
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>> getting inside the mind of the fort hood shooter, new information about what may have set off the army specialist to go on his killing spree. >> cleaning up after a series of powerful storms and tornadoes in the midwest, the system heading east. >> the monthly jobs report 30 minutes away, some economists predicting spring will fall, the numbers causing unemployment to go down.
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>> nearly five years after his death, never before heard music from the king of pop, michael jackson on all the way, the power he still holds on the charts. military officials are learning moor about the man who shot and killed three at fort hood texas this week. on thursday, they identified ivan antonio lopez as the shooter, a 34-year-old army specialist. investigate ears say the iraq war veteran was taking medication for anxiety and depression, but an evaluation last month revealed he had no signs or history of any violence. they're still trying to figure out exactly why he went on that shooting rampage killing three and wounding 16 others. tracking all the developments this morning. we are learning a lot more about ivan lopez. >> del, yes we are, investigators say there's a strong possibility that he argued with one or more soldiers
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shortly before the shooting. there are reports he was upset about only being granted a 24 hour leave to go to his mom's funeral. investigators are trying to determine just what set him off. >> by all accounts, no one could predict the violence unleashed, by an experienced soldier who spent half his life in the military. the army's top brass discussed his experience and military record. >> this was an experienced soldier. he spent actually nine years in the puerto rico national guard before coming on active duty, so he's a very experienced soldier. >> he had a clean record in terms of his behavioral, no outstanding bad marks for any kinds of major misbehaviors that we are yet aware of. >> but as officials look for a motive as to what would cause had husband and father to go on a shooting rampage that killed three people and wounded 16
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others, it's miss mental stability and actions leading up to the shootings that may yelled clues. >> we have very strong evidence that he had a medical history that indicates unstable psychiatric or psychological condition, gone through all the records to ensure that that is in fact correct and we believe that to be the fundamental underlying causal factor. >> lopez had seen a military psychiatrist as late as last month where he was treated for depression and anxiety, and was taking sleep medication. he served four months of duty in iraq. while he never saw combat and there are no record of injuries, military officials said he told his supervisors that he suffered from a traumatic brain injury and was being evaluated for post traumatic stress disorder. investigators are examining the possibility that lopez may have had an argument with one or more soldiers in the minutes leading up to the shooting.
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>> we do not have that definitelyively, but have strong indications of that. >> meanwhile, lopez's wife is cooperating with the f.b.i., helping them to understand her husband's state of mind. even back at their apartment complex, a short distance from fort hood, neighbors say there was no indication of the shooting that was to come. >> i saw him at lunch, you know, and he seemed perfectly fine, and it's mind-blowing, really. >> we've been updated on the conditions of the nine most seriously injured, six were just released from a hospital and the remaining three in critical condition, but now they're in serious condition. >> troubling report from killeen, texas. >> it is day 28 for missing malaysia airlines flight 370. there is an underwater search for the plane's black boxes, the data recorder will run out of battery power early next week. several planes and ships
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continue to comb the indian ocean pour any sign of debris. >> we don't know how long the search will last. it is probably the most difficult search that's ever been mounted. a large aircraft seems like something that would be easy enough to locate, but a large aircraft that all but disappeared and disappeared into inaccessible oceans is an extraordinary challenge that you're faced with. >> more resources were committed to that search on friday. the british have lent a nuclear schaub rein to help out. the flight disappeared march 8. 239 people were onboard. >> a state of emergency declared in missouri after severe weather, one tornado touching
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down in university city causing power outages and destroying houses and cars that. in the south, take a look at the size of hail that fell in oklahoma. the national weather service saying winds were clocked at 110 miles an hour. the hail was even bigger in texas, this was the hail in den to know, the size of baseballs. fallen trees knocked out power, that storm now moving east today. as it continues to push across the northeast, bringing the threat of more severe weather, we turn to our meteorologist, nicole mitchell. >> in that video, all part of the same storm system bringing flooding rain around st. louis yesterday where you were woken up by tornado sirens with storms that went through dumping the heavy rain, now moving to places like illinois and indiana as the
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system moves along. we also had elements like the hail out there. i know you like the trivia. the larger the hail, the faster it will fall from the sky, because it's heavier, so hail can come down over 60 miles an hour, even faster at some times. it can kill you if it's coming down fast enough in a large enough piece. you really need to take that just at seriously as you take the damages winds and possible tornadoes. here's where the system is today, midsection of the country, really kind of taken over by this as all of this has gone through. a lot of reports were hail, those are the blues. today, it's a little bit more the orange dots, that's damaging wind, so a lot of trees and power lines are down. eight reports from yesterday of tornadoes. the national weather service go in the day after, see if it was a straight line wind or twisting wind to see if it was straight line wind or a tornado. we still have tornado watches
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up, just the possibility, nothing imminent at the moment. if a warning comes up, that's when you really need to take shelter. thunderstorm warnings through the region, the northern side of this, a winter storm. i'll have more on that coming up. >> these are live images of storm damage in hopkins county, texas. there were widespread power outages last night. the entire midwest being slammed with tornados and also that hail that caused so many problems. >> the president of chili promising her government will do everything it can to help communities rebuild after powerful earthquakes devastated the country this week. coastal residents are spending a second night outside, too afraid to go back into the damaged buildings. we report from one hard-hit area. >> a boat flying through the air in the port, one of dozens of fishing vessels that can no longer float in the water. >> we were 200 meters out on the
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dock when the earthquake struck, crashing the boat on to the pier. now my arms of crossed. i can't work to feed my family. >> in fact, no one is out fishing, the port is closed, and in any case, there's no ice to keep the catch fresh, i'm told. it's been three days since a massive earthquake brought the port city of nearly a half million people to a standstill and patience is wearing thin. >> this water is only good enough for the toilet, this woman complaints. nearby, we discover that hundreds of merchants from neighboring bolivia who regularly come for the day to buy merchandise are now stranded, many penniless. the only road to the border is blocked by a landslide. >> i've never had this experience before. we don't have earth quakes in bolivia. i want to go home. >> there have been hundreds of
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aftershocks. at least one almost as strong as the earthquake, and so residents of this neighborhood are taking to the hills. diego shows us the structural damage to his flat, the worst is in his son's bedroom. >> we're sleeping outside in a tent. we're afraid the flat will collapse on top of us, because the main pillars of the building are now bent. it's too dangerous. >> thousands of homes are damaged, the government is just beginning to assess the destruction and plan a strategy to help the victims. >> no longer willing to wait for the road to open, these bolivians are starting to walk to the border, 450 kilometers away. >> it will take them several days to walk it, that's about 280 miles. in the u.s., smaller earthquakes in california, a 3.1 tremor striking malibu, the other a 3.7
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in napa valley. >> anger in germany over alleged u.s. spying, thursday the government beginning hearings in the n.s.a. and other foreign intelligence programs. last year, edward snowden leaked classified documents revealing the u.s. speed on german chancellor angela merkel. >> the senate intelligence committee declassifying part of a c.i.a. report detailing interrogation program launched after the 9/11 attacks. this could be the most definitive account so far of what the c.i.a. did. >> did the c.i.a. cross the line, using waterboarding and other technique to say interrogate 9/11 terror suspects and did it work? is it how the u.s. tracked down osama bin laden and prevented other attacks? we may soon know. the senate intelligence committee voted 11-3 thursday to
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give the public a look at the summary of its report. >> the results were shocking, chronicles a stain on our history that must never be allowed to happen again. this is not what americans do. >> even republicans who voted for disclosure question whether this report is accurate. there are no direct interviews with the c.i.a. or anyone in the bush administration, and no republicans joined the investigation. they thought it was biased. >> i was never in favor of this report being done. i think it was a waste of time. the general public can make up their minds about whether or not this was done properly. >> the c.i.a. claims the committee accessed information without being authorized. committee chair dianne feinstein accuses the c.i.a. of spying on the investigation. it's up to president obama how soon this report goes public. >> he would expect that the action that are necessary to
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declassify a document like that be conducted in all due haste. >> the process could take weeks. the white house has to review the summary. >> first the pictures, now the drones, evidence north korea is spying, using 190 photos of the presidential office were taken along with other parts of the country. two north creek drones crashed inside south korea. the military is under fire for filing detect those drones. >> south korea's coast guard launching rescue operations for a missing cargo ship with 14 crew members onboard. two of those crew members died, three rescued, 11 said to still be missing. >> the obama administration is down playing and associated
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press investigation into so-called cuban twitter. the associated press saying u.s. aid financed a social network aimed at undermining that countries communist regime. >> it's no secret that young unionens crave access to social media. a new report claims the u.s. wanted to exploit that by setting up the service similar to twitter. according to the associated press, it was done through a complicated system of front companies, set up a ooh broad to hide it from the cuban authorities. nothing sinister, says washington. >> again, this was not an intelligence program. this was an effort, one of a variety of efforts that the united engages in as part of its development mission to promote the flow of free information, to promote engagement by citizens of countries in societies that
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are non-per missive. >> the idea was to build up a strong customer base using non-controversial material before launching more politically provocative messages. the first test came in havana in 2009 at this peace concert for the colombian singer. cuban users were unaware the scheme was funded by the u.s. representatives in havana in the absence of diplomatic relations by this interest section. >> the cubans would say there's nothing new in the u.s. efforts to undermine its government, but the scope of these revelations goes beyond anything seen in recent years, the pressure on the u.s. presence here has suddenly grown dramatically. >> cuban slang for the noise a humming bird makes was set up by an employee from one of the most tightly controlled communications systems in the
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world. >> it's one or more example of what's been going on for 50 years, the u.s. just cannot owe open it's so obsessed with cuba, it cannot stop trying to overthrow it. >> it found it increasingly difficult to find suitable partners as the service grew. its funding of the scheme paying millions of dollars to the very authorities it was trying to undermine became unsustainable. by 2012, it disappeared. the political damage caused by these revelations will linger for a while longer. aljazeera, havana, cuba. >> an american made map isn't the only thing troubling cubans these days. they weren't aware that american contractors running the program were also gathering personal data so it could be used later for political purposes. >> enethical battle taking shape over one of the countries energy futures, past disasters weighing
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on the decision whether or not to drill for oil. >> the heavy price tag one company's going to have to pay for causing one of the largest environmental disasters in the nation's history. >> a defining moment for afghanistan as the afghan people go to the polls to pick their countries next president.
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>> welcome back to aljazeera america. in a moment, secretary of state john kerry, we're going to talk about his attempt to revive the mideast peace talks some say hang on the brink of collapse. but first let's get a look at temperatures across the nation today. >> part of what's fueling the system causing all the problems is hot air getting thunderstorms going. you can really see the backside where the front has gone through, minneapolis and 26 degrees, dealing with snow and treacherous roads. ahead that have, temperaturion in the 60's this morning, the south is where the warm air is, where we're dealing with the thunderstorms and through the portion of the day, up through the mid atlantic, the hot air is really going to be a dividing line, places like new york only into the 40's, in the warm air
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section, washington, d.c. is in the 60's, just depending what side that have boundary you're on. with all that have, enhancing our risk for severe systems today, on the cold side, dealing with it in wisconsin. >> it's reality check time for u.s. led peace talks, israeli supposed to release a fourth and final group of political detineees, that's been canceled, sparking talk about the future of those talks. >> for 247 days, america's top diplomat made middle east peace its top priority, john kerry meeting 39 times with palestinian officials, more than 40 times with israeli officials, press conference after press conference after press conference, but thursday alone and separated from both sides by 1500 miles, kerry made a last minute plea for them to keep
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talking. >> the leaders have to lead, and they have to be able to see a moment when it's there. there's an old saying you can lead a horse to water, but you can't make it drink. now it's time to drink and the leaders need to know that. >> but neither side seems 30 city, first after releasing three groups of prisoners, the israeli's refused to release a fourth group. then palestinian president abass signed 15 international agreements even though he promised not to. in response, the israelis canceled the prisoner release. >> the decision to delay the release of the fourth group of prisoners creates challenges. >> the question is whether those challenges are insurmountable. >> i think the president and secretary of state john kerry need to be involved and engaged in the process by prodding both sides to avoid unilateral moves, to take the kind of necessary
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steps that are needed, make the kind of compromises and demonstrate the flexibility that neither side has thus far been able to do. >> neither side walked away yet, meaning kerry and his aids will work to keep both sides talking. >> we will continue, no matter what to try to facilitate the capacity to be able to make peace. >> that's nick shiffrin reporting, israel's decision not to release the final round of palestinian prisoners prompting demonstrations in the west bank today. israeli forces firing tear gas and rubber coated bullets south of ramallah. >> a landmark settlement for the environmental disaster, anna darko paying more than $5 billion to settle claims related to chowses of contaminated sites across the country. the agreement bringing it into a
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lawsuit by a chemical company it bath in 2006. it tried to dodge paying for the cleanup by splitting the country in parts. >> a reversal by exxon-mobil after pressure from investors, saying it will publicly disclose dangers of fracking. beginning in september, it is expected to reveal how it affects air quality, water and chemical usage and damage to roads. the report won't include information about methane seeping into the atmosphere. a new york city pension fund holding $1 billion of company stock putting pressure on exon to release that data. >> the oil industry getting a lot of attention in norway this morning. the country invests most of its revenue from oil into a camp wealth fund. as aljazeera reports, what to do with that money is always one of norway's most contentious political issues. >> one day, it will all run out, of course, but for now, norway can essentially pump money from beneath its waters.
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oil or gas the world wants, and norway has it. it also has an ethical conundrum. >> who do we want to be in norway? do we want to be in tar sand, fukushima, deep water horizon don or do we want to be with the renewable solar wind, bio electrical cars? i think the answer is quite easy to that. >> frederik is one of many norwegians calling for the country's vast petrol wealth to be invested in a more environmental friendly way and it's some wealth, managed from this land, building in central oslo. >> $855 billion, that is the current value of norway's oil fund. that's about $170,000 for every living norwegian. on average, the fund owns more than 1% of the entire world's listed stocks, but it also
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invests in bonds and property, too. >> the government's already looking into dumping the shares of heavy polluters like coal companies. friday we'll see an announcement on what's next for green tech investment. there are voices urging caution, though, the fund, says this economist, should be playing it safe. >> there will always be politicians and interest groups in society that would like this money to be spent one way or the other. whatever is the current fashion in the investment industry, to invest in environment and solar industry and so on. for the politicians to pick and choose which sectors will grow faster than others, for politicians to do these kind of priorities i think is kind of few tile. >> they feel they should be doing more than watching the pile grow.
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oslo. >> norwayed sovereign wealth fund bigger than the entire economy. the finance minister saying the government should double its investment in renewable energy to $5.83 billion. >> we are minutes away from the monthly jobs report, more than 3 million americans still out of work. we'll talk about the impact of the numbers on wall street and main street. >> in spain, it's about jobs, 25% unemployment rate, resulting in citizens taking anger to the street. the group that's bearing the brunt of these economic pains the most. >> he's get another one, the king of pop liking to reclaim his throne with a collection of new songs five years after his death. >> a fall out from an incident involving a heisman trophy winner continues, not for him, but his school. details ahead.
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>> you're looking live at the iconic ed sullivan theater. that's dave. why is he smiling? the late night show is -- well, he's got a big announcement he made last night. we'll tell you more about that straight ahead. ahead, we're going to talk about the march jobs report that is now just moments away. we will break down the numbers and what it means for the health of the u.s. economy. >> in spain, they face a tougher unemployment picture there. that has tens of thousands taking to the streets because they are very upset. >> a defining moment in afghanistan, saturday going to the polls to cast ballots for the next president.
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it will be the first democratic transition of power ever in that country. we take a look at one presidential hopeful. >> even those hoping to run this country can't travel its roads. this presidential candidate's helicopter lands at a spot just a two hour drive from the capitol. a journey considered too dangerous for him. previously, foreign minister, he is seen at president hamid karzai's chosen successor. that could come with a legacy of corruption linked to this government. >> the karzai government will be very well known for a long time for horrendous levels of corruption. you were part of that government. what will you do differently? >> first of all, i've not been involved in any corruption issues. i repeat myself that the fact that i've been involved, i know what's happening.
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i know what kind of thing we should do to correct that. i want to put this experience that i've got into service of the afghan people. >> while he was foreign minister, karzai refused to sign a bilateral security agreement with the u.s., allowing some foreign troop to say remain in the country, throwing releases with the u.s. into crisis. >> the fundamental of relation of afghanistan to the united states is solid. we have problems, problems happen with friends. i was personally involved on drafting it from the afghan side, i believe that national interests of afghanistan has been respected in that and that is in the interest of afghanistan and united states, and i'm hopeful that this will be signed soon. >> speeches are heard by thousands of locals, including supporters of warlords. of the eight men running for president, he is one of only
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three to have a female vice president, but like political campaigns the world over, i am manual and protocol mold themselves to campaign locations. >> the candidates want to present themselves as the future of a modern afghan state, but in reality when they travel into the provinces to areas like this, 13 years since the fall of the taliban, there is not a single woman in this crowd. >> educated in europe's final schools, worked at highest levels of the afghan government, his legacy as a descendent of the ole royal family is seen as an asset. he will be seen as a vote for continuity. if afghans want more of the same style of government, then he stands a very strong chance of leading it. aljazeera, afghanistan.
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>> sarah change joins us from washington, d.c. good morning, i want to go back to something that was in the package just a moment ago, 13 years and yet in rural places where these candidates are campaigning, not a single woman. how much has really changed? >> not at much as i think is usually projected in the united states. i think another point that's glaringly missing from that package is the likelihood that this election will be rigged. >> i was going to bring that up. there are doubt that this is going to be fair and free, so even by afghan standards, how should the u.s. gauge the winner? >> i had contest the expression even by afghan standards. the afghan population was looking for the international community to help put in place conditions for freer and fairer
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political involvement by the people, for basic rule of law, accountability, and are quite disappointed that the international intervention didn't provide that, so i wouldn't put that on the backs of the afghan, certainly not the afghan population. what you've seen is -- what you're seeing in this campaign really is almost two parallel tracks, your package is absolutely right in describing a significant degree of enthusiasm, of involvement by afghan people in this election, even though previous ones were very fraudulent. >> i was going to talk about what you just said, which is that the afghan people are looking for help to make this a fair election but want to show you the latest polls that seem to indicate that americans just don't care. >> exactly. >> 52% of americans believe the americans have failed to achieve
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its goals in afghanistan. a december poll finding a that the afghan war might well be lost, it may be the most unpopular war in american history, 82% of americans are now opposed to that war, opposition back in 2008 was 46%, so with that being said, it's almost like if an election is held and nobody from the west takes a look, does it happen. should americans care about the outcome of this election? >> whether they should or not, i agree with you that they don't, and that's what leaves open real possibilities for just enormous fraud lent manipulation of the results. that's what i'm saying i guess that although of afghan population is enthusiastic about it, there's plenty of opportunity for president karzai to, you know, affect the outcome by ways that he did last time around in 2009, which is basically just playing rant stuffing of ballot boxes, so the result, i think the most
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important thing for americans to bear in mind is that we're going to have more of the same. we are going to have more of the same with a likely continuity of karzai power behind the scenes and not many americans are going to mind. >> you think this is going to be karzai 2.0 and whatnot the relationship between afghanistan and pakistan. >> that's an interesting, complex one. on the face of it, it looks like a rocky and unpleasant relationship, but beneath the surface of the words, just like with the electoral campaign, penalty karzai has not taken many actions that go against what pakistan wants to happen. i suspect that you will be seeing some sort of an increase in indirect pakistani control over a lot of afghanistan. >> sarah chase, senior associate at the carney endowment for international justice and peace joins us from washington, d.c.
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thank you for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> we are following a monthly jobs report. we have breaking news on the jobs numbers, i asked you up, down, you said eh. >> it's improving, a good sign, the numbers came in below consensus. in march, the economy added 192,000 jobs. that was slightly below a consensus estimate of 200,000, but it was an improvement over the initial headline number of february last year. february actually was revised up to 197, so that was encouraging, the unemployment rate was unchanged at 6.7%. the labor force participation rate edged up slightly. the labor force participation rate, of course is the number of people who are in work and actively looking for jobs. you want that sort of beauancy
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participation rate. >> we've had a very harsh winter and there's much debate about that impacting the numbers. construction jobs, we added 19,000 construction jobs last month, a very good, encouraging sign. construction jobs have a multiplier effect, creating lots of other jobs around them. not so encouragingly, though, manufacturing jobs were down. we were down 1,000 jobs, so that's not as encouraging. overall, what can we say about this report is that the economy is still on this slow trajectly of i am movement, adding jobs. we were short of consensus estimates but had a revision up in february. what we had is this slow steady pace of job growth.
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janet yellen acknowledged this in a speech on monday, saying quite poignantly that this recovery still feels like a recession to many americans, one of the reasons for that is because of the slow, steady growth. >> it is the new normal. >> it is the new normal. >> well, you think we have it bad here, a thousand workers from countries gathered in belgium protesting the european union economic policies, calling to an end to austerity measures. in spain, workers say austerity is leaving them broke, some pointing physician at big american companies. >> they are chanting the name of one of the world's best known soft drinks. these workers have just been laid off. they got the letter today, it's not uncommon in today's spain. >> many companies with a lot of
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profit are laying off many people, and they have to know that we are living the worst crisis in the last 70 years. >> our main fear is being unprotected, the fear of not having a future or life plan. we have a 50% youth under 25 who will never have a pension. >> thousands marched through the spanish capitol on thursday. this latest protest was organized by the three main trade unions. the noise was devonning, they shouted as loud as they could. these are voices you feel that are not being heard. >> these pro tests are becoming more and more common not just here in madrid but across spain. as far as these people are concerned, their government has got it's priorities the wrong way around. they wanted to park the idea of paying the e.u. back, save that for another day and concentrate on bringing unemployment down, taxes down, making spain a better place to live. >> unemployment has fallen by
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1%, but it's still very high in this country, sitting at 25%, that means more than 5 million people without work and the oecd, organization for economic cooperation and development said spain's poorest are being hit harder than any other place in the euro zone. >> we have thousands of children going hungry for the first time in decades in this country, the situation is one of collective poverty. >> and collective trust reaction wimp led to this nearly two weeks ago, adeem know in the streets became a riot. anger is not in short supply here. the protest was much more peaceful, police stayed back, protestors making their point. they are not likely to stop until they see hope ahead. aljazeera, madrid. >> the spanish government saying its reforms are working, saying it will cut the debt 5.8% of the gross domestic product this time
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next year. >> a nationwide manhunt on for a pedophile who soaped himself having sex with a young boy. do you know this man is what the f.b.i. is can go the public putting out this photo of a 28-year-old child predator joan at john doe, the man wearing glasses, a burgundy shirt and fish photo in the background. >> a freshman shot himself in the hand, no one else injured. the school was on lockdown on wednesday at kent state university. >> an overdose victim can have breathing restored by a new device. it will be available this
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summer. >> the longest winning streak in the nba came to an end last night. we have all the sad details. >> it's sad depending on who you were rooting for. we have to appreciate this winning streak. what was really great about the san antonio spurs win streak was an average margin of victory of 17 points per game, the wins convincing. the spurs won without at least one of their so-called big three in the lineup, duncan, parker and ginobili. kemp durant does a lot of that, eclipsed the 29-point mark, he looks to be a shoo in for the league's scoring title.
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the thunder win, the spurs win streak ends at 19 games. oklahoma city has taken all four games from the spurs this season. >> the most considerate thing josh reddick has done is to change the shaving cream pies with whipped cream pies. number one, shaving cream pies sting you in the eyes. take it from me, i know what it's like. number two, the a's have had 23 walk off wins over the last two seasons, so there were a lot of pies flying around. in oakland, the a's down 2-0 in the fifth when sam fuld sent one all all the way to the wall in center field, thinking inside the parker. that tested the no blocking the plate rule. the umpires looked to the replay to determine that he was not blocking the plate, take another look, seems to be a righteous call. a's would rally to tie the game.
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coco crisp would show us his pie face launching the walk off game-winning hit. 3-2 over seattle. >> florida, kentucky, wisconsin, and connecticut, they are all in texas for the final four, i mean the college basketball teams, not the entire populations of each state, which it will seem they are all there this weekend. officials expect a crowd of around 75,000 fans on one or more of the games this weekend. >> we know our guys are going to get in front of 75,000, look around and think oh my, it's going to be that way. then we'll both try to settle down our teams and try to get them to focus on basketball, lose themselves in the game and the just play a basketball game. >> it would be so exciting if we were to be the last team standing. i would just stand back and look at those guys, and just smile, inside and outside.
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>> pick patino's louisville cardinals are out of the big dance. his 31-year-old son richard led minnesota against the tigers. the mustangs that is. hitting a triple proofed to be the different as minnesota wins the title for the third time in school history. >> its common knowledge that florida state's heisman winning quarterback winston was under investigation for a rape accusation. he was acquitted, but it's florida state coming under fire. the u.s. department of education's office of civil rights opened and investigation into the university's handling of the situation, and into any potential title nine violations the university may have made. the a.c.r. tells schools that
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the school is not relieved of its duty to investigate under section nine. >> no details yet, but a press conference is scheduled for 1:30 eastern time for plenty of details. >> will those whipped cream piece have the f.d.a. warning labels on calorie count? >> let me check into that for you. >> life after death for michael jackson still making lots of money, tons of it and now a new album. we'll talk about it.
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>> welcome to al jazeera america.
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straight ahead, michael jackson with a new album five years after his death. we'll talk about whether it can become a commercial success. first, the rain and snow across the country today with nicole mitchell. >> we had this potent storm system through the south in mississippi or alabama, that line of strong storms, damaging wind the biggest threat with that. i want to get to the northern side of this. this is not the time of year for a major snowstorm and that's exactly what we have. it can happen, obviously is happening. this is pretty significant. parts of minneapolis, northern parts of wisconsin, a foot or more in some cases and it's still going. over the course of the day, u.p. of michigan, some places could get two feet of snow with high winds and the rain moves into the northeast. back to you. >> michael jackson passed away in 2009, but last year, he was the highest paid celebrity in show business living or dead.
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according to forest magazine, the king of pop earning $160 million in 2013. he was followed by elvis with $55 million. charles shuts, $37 million and elizabeth taylor making $25 million last year. jackson's estate looks to add to those earnings. they will release a new album of never before herd michael jackson songs. bill joins us from the west coast. michael jackson's "thriller," the highest of all time still setting the bar for performers. why is he still popular today? >> he just is such an engaging and likable and extraordinarily talented guy, that he's a little bit like the beatles with recurring generations somehow find their way to him. on the other hand, he worked pretty hard during the last years of his life to pretty much
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destroy his career and that image, so the fact that he has any popularity today is pretty remarkable, as well. >> four years after his death, the concert video was reds in videos and then a year later, the album "michael" came out. how well were those two received? >> again, it's all sort of relative. they did very well by any standards, by most people's standards. "this is it" had a lot to recommend in terms of being able to watch him in action, even if it didn't tell you the whole foyer about his health condition at the time. michael the album was a flop, so i'm skeptical about the next one. >> if anything emerged out of that documentary is that he was obsessive and me tim clues about the music that he made. do you think he's going to be happy with the release of these songs? >> yes and no. again, the last 15 years of his life was sort of spent in a drug
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induced and psychological haze and legal problems of his own making, let's be honest about that. i have to be a little bit cynical and think if there was some great hits in his archive, he and his people would have released it during his lifetime, because the last decade of his life was bereft of hits. they will work with the vocals that they found of his. >> a lot of critics didn't like his last albums when he was living. is he now being appreciated more in death as an artist than in life? >> there's a tragedy to him, you sympathize with this incredibly looking young boy that was nine or 10 becoming a star and 10 or 15 years later achieving superstardom with hissal bulls. i think he has this residual
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thing that we all sort of root for him. as a critic, a fan, he didn't give his fans much of anything over those last 10 or 15 years of his life either on stage or on record. >> news made in new york last night, david letterman announcing that after three decades in late night television, he is going to retire sometime in 2015. >> this is a water shed moment in the history of television. there are not too many of what you call the old lions, anyone with connections to the great old lions of television. i think he'll go down at one of the great show hosts of all time. i admire him for his willingness to not always suck up to his guests. he always seemed to be on the audience's side and cause trouble wherever he could. >> known for his top 10 lists and stupid pet tricks. >> you have your top five list. >> of moo might succeed him.
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t.v. landscape is changing a lot these days. nobody knows what's going to happen. there's no sentimentality in cbs. this is owned by what used to be called viacom, mtv and comedy central. conan o'brien is still running around, kneel patrick harris has really been doing a great job hosting the tonies, has a great persona. >> a lot of people are pulling for conan to make a comeback. >> i can't tell if he's damaged goods or not. he had a chance and didn't find an audience. they are going to be looking where is that audience going over the next five to 10 years and you have to be frank about this, it's a very, very older audience that watches those shows and cbs has to figure out where they're going to make money on that audience.
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>> bill, thank you very much. >> two paintings abandoned at a train station in italy auctioned off, but the owner found the paintings were stolen and worth millions. >> after four decades hanging on a kitchen wall, these matter pieces back on show and getting attention. they were snatched from a london home in 1970 and abandoned on a train traveling from paris. >> after they were found, having no idea of their value, they were put up to auction and bought by a working man who was an art lover. the owner hung these paintings in a kitchen. >> that's where they stayed, until the man's son wanted to know more about them and contacted police. his dad had been sitting on a gold mine, because this is a piece by french post impressionist, and his contemporary. >> the value of the painting, experts can definitely give a
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better answer but starts approximately at $13 million and could reach more than $40 million. >> such a find for italian police that cultural minister was showing them off. italy's taken a lead role in the fight against art smuggling, there's even a special police unit set up to investigate stolen art, and solve the mysteries of missing treasures like these. >> italian police are currently holding on to the paintings while they decide what to do next. >> that's going to do it for this edition of aljazeera america. we want to leave you with a look at all of the efforts by african migrants in a life and death struggle, fighting just to make it over a fence that divides morocco and the spanish enclave trying to make it to spain looking for a better life, sometimes trying to survive conflicts that could spell
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instant death. there is more news straight ahead, in just two minutes. we'll see you then.
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>> announcer: this is al jazeera. ♪ >> hello, welcome to the news hour. i'm in doha. these are the world's top news stories. clashes in the west bank israeli forces fired tier gas at palestinians protesting the cancellation of prisoner release. in afghanistan a journalist has been shot dead and another injured a day before the presidential

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